Top: Bilal, 6, Wadi Abu Hindi, The West Bank
Middle: Jaime, 9, New York, USA
Bottom: Indira, 7, Kathmandu, Nepal
James Mollison, from the series Where Children Sleep. Pictures taken around the world of children and their bedrooms.
"Where Children Sleep is about stories of diverse children around the world, told through portraits and pictures of their bedrooms. I found myself thinking about my bedroom: how significant it was during my childhood, and how it reflected what I had and who I was. My thinking was that the bedroom pictures would be inscribed with the children’s material. The book is written and presented for an audience of 9-13 year olds ‘ intended to interest and engage children in the details of the lives of other children around the world."
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Related, Rania Matar’s series A Girl and Her Room

Top: Bilal, 6, Wadi Abu Hindi, The West Bank

Middle: Jaime, 9, New York, USA

Bottom: Indira, 7, Kathmandu, Nepal

James Mollison, from the series Where Children Sleep. Pictures taken around the world of children and their bedrooms.

"Where Children Sleep is about stories of diverse children around the world, told through portraits and pictures of their bedrooms. I found myself thinking about my bedroom: how significant it was during my childhood, and how it reflected what I had and who I was. My thinking was that the bedroom pictures would be inscribed with the children’s material. The book is written and presented for an audience of 9-13 year olds ‘ intended to interest and engage children in the details of the lives of other children around the world."

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Related, Rania Matar’s series A Girl and Her Room

Benoit P from the series Stranger Tourist Self Portraits
(Thanks Wayne)
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Related

Benoit P from the series Stranger Tourist Self Portraits

(Thanks Wayne)

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Related

(via)

(via)


By Steven Siegel, The Bowery and Houston Street circa 1980 from the set NY in the 80s
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“Poverty is not simply having no money — it is isolation, vulnerability, humiliation and mistrust. It is not being able to differentiate between employers and exploiters and abusers [j: I’d say it is not having the luxury of the choice to choose between them]. It is contempt for the simplistic illusion of meritocracy — the idea that what we get is what we work for. It is knowing that your mother, with her arthritic joints and her maddening insomnia and her post-traumatic stress disordered heart, goes to work until two in the morning waiting tables for less than minimum wage, or pushes a janitor’s cart and cleans the shit-filled toilets of polished professionals. It is entering a room full of people and seeing not only individual people, but violent systems and stark divisions. It is the violence of untreated mental illness exacerbated by the fact that reality, from some vantage points, really does resemble a psychotic nightmare. It is the violence of abuse and assault which is ignored or minimized by police officers, social services, and courts of law. Poverty is conflict. And for poor kids lucky enough to have the chance to “move up,” it is the conflict between remaining oppressed or collaborating with the oppressor.”
Megan Lee from this article about academia

By Steven Siegel, The Bowery and Houston Street circa 1980 from the set NY in the 80s

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Poverty is not simply having no money — it is isolation, vulnerability, humiliation and mistrust. It is not being able to differentiate between employers and exploiters and abusers [j: I’d say it is not having the luxury of the choice to choose between them]. It is contempt for the simplistic illusion of meritocracy — the idea that what we get is what we work for. It is knowing that your mother, with her arthritic joints and her maddening insomnia and her post-traumatic stress disordered heart, goes to work until two in the morning waiting tables for less than minimum wage, or pushes a janitor’s cart and cleans the shit-filled toilets of polished professionals. It is entering a room full of people and seeing not only individual people, but violent systems and stark divisions. It is the violence of untreated mental illness exacerbated by the fact that reality, from some vantage points, really does resemble a psychotic nightmare. It is the violence of abuse and assault which is ignored or minimized by police officers, social services, and courts of law. Poverty is conflict. And for poor kids lucky enough to have the chance to “move up,” it is the conflict between remaining oppressed or collaborating with the oppressor.

Megan Lee from this article about academia

Thorsten Brinkmann, Portraits of a Serialsammler
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Maybe just a bit John Chamberlain 
and maybe also just a little bit this  
And this

Thorsten Brinkmann, Portraits of a Serialsammler

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Maybe just a bit John Chamberlain 

and maybe also just a little bit this 

And this

(via vermaphrodite)

This is what Jules Verne looks like. Those look like the eyes of a nice guy. Thank you to Jules for making my early teenage years that much more adventurous.
Photograph by Nadar who also took portraits of sculptors, painters, writers, poets, composers and others of his time including George Sand, Alphonse Daudet, Sarah Bernhardt, Victor Hugo, Antoine-Louis Bayre, Eugène Delacroix, Franz Liszt, Rossini and Charles Baudelaire. Good to see what some of those people looked like.
Apparently, Nadar was a balloonist, which in the mid-1800s was kind of like being an adventurer-type like Richard Branson today (minus the publicity stunt aspect). As a friend to Jules Verne, Nadar influenced the content of some of Verne’s writing. 
Nadar portraits from the J. Paul Getty Museum and the MOMA and Histoire par l’image

This is what Jules Verne looks like. Those look like the eyes of a nice guy. Thank you to Jules for making my early teenage years that much more adventurous.

Photograph by Nadar who also took portraits of sculptors, painters, writers, poets, composers and others of his time including George Sand, Alphonse Daudet, Sarah Bernhardt, Victor Hugo, Antoine-Louis Bayre, Eugène Delacroix, Franz Liszt, Rossini and Charles Baudelaire. Good to see what some of those people looked like.

Apparently, Nadar was a balloonist, which in the mid-1800s was kind of like being an adventurer-type like Richard Branson today (minus the publicity stunt aspect). As a friend to Jules Verne, Nadar influenced the content of some of Verne’s writing. 

Nadar portraits from the J. Paul Getty Museum and the MOMA and Histoire par l’image

Gustav KlimtPortrait of Helene Klimt (niece), 1898, oil on cardboard, 60 x 40 cm, private collection.

Gustav Klimt

Portrait of Helene Klimt (niece), 1898, oil on cardboard, 60 x 40 cm, private collection.

(via marysoul)